3 days in Puglia Itinerary

3 days in Puglia Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Puglia tour itinerary planner

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Make it your trip
1
Bari
— 1 night
Drive
2
Lecce
— 1 night
Drive

S M T W T F S
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

Bari

— 1 night

Gateway to Apulia

Puglia's capital city, Bari, is a growing metropolis of industry and one of the country's most important commercial ports.
On the 22nd (Wed), make a trip to Citta Vecchia - Bari and then take in the spiritual surroundings of Basilica San Nicola. On your second day here, pause for some serene contemplation at Chiesa San Michele in Frangesto, then admire the landmark architecture of I Trulli di Alberobello - World Heritage Site, and then don't miss a visit to Centro Storico di Polignano a Mare.

To see other places to visit, where to stay, maps, and other tourist information, refer to the Bari road trip planner.

The Route module can give you travel options from your home to Bari. In December, plan for daily highs up to 16°C, and evening lows to 5°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 23rd (Thu) to allow enough time to drive to Lecce.

Things to do in Bari

Historic Sites

Side Trips

Find places to stay Dec 22 — 23:

Lecce

— 1 night

Florence of the South

Known as the Florence of the South, Lecce is distinguished for its elaborate Baroque monuments.
On the 24th (Fri), make a trip to Centro Storico, Lecce, then contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Chiesa di Sant'Irene, and then take in the architecture and atmosphere at Duomo di Lecce.

To find maps, more things to do, and more tourist information, go to the Lecce trip planning website.

You can drive from Bari to Lecce in 2 hours. Other options are to take a train; or take a bus. December in Lecce sees daily highs of 17°C and lows of 5°C at night. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 24th (Fri) so you can go by car back home.

Things to do in Lecce

Historic Sites
Find places to stay Dec 23 — 24:

Puglia travel guide

4.1
Beaches · Landmarks · Churches
Situated at the southeastern tip of the country, Puglia forms the heel on the "boot" of Italy. First colonized by Mycenaean Greeks, the region flourished during Roman times as a major producer of grain and oil. Today, Puglia remains a predominantly agricultural part of the country, though its warm and sunny coastal weather makes it a favorite holiday destination with an ever-increasing number of tourists. The long coastline features attractions like sun-kissed beaches and lively resorts, many of which are overlooked by limestone cliffs. Deeper inland, Puglia is largely flat, a land of charming villages and world-class cuisine. Here, you'll find olive oil, grapes, tomatoes, peppers, mushrooms, and fresh seafood to give you sustenance as you continue sightseeing. Despite its reputation as a producer of some Italy's best food and wines, Puglia still has numerous rural corners that most tourists have yet to explore.