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Kyoto Station Building, Kyoto

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Shopping Mall · Architectural Building
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Built in a futuristic style to commemorate the city's 1200th birthday, Kyoto Station Building serves as one of the country's main transportation hubs. Though Kyoto remains best known for its traditional architecture, this high-tech attraction designed by Hara Hiroshi stands out as a clear deviation from that style. As you walk through the station, take note of the steel-beamed roof, aptly dubbed "The Matrix." Beyond the well-known architecture, this station serves a practical purpose, providing millions of locals and tourists with not only access to major transport lines, but also shopping mall, movie theater, hotel, and numerous local government offices. Our Kyoto trip planner makes visiting Kyoto Station Building and other Kyoto attractions simple, and helps you make a travel plan personal to you.
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  • Obviously you can't avoid visiting here if you visit Kyoto, unless you somehow use another station or simply change trains here. The main area to see is the large hall at the 'front' (north) of the... 
    Obviously you can't avoid visiting here if you visit Kyoto, unless you somehow use another station or simply change trains here. The main area to see is the large hall at the 'front' (north) of the...  more »
  • The design of the building is impressive and beautiful, especially inside. It's also very big. Like any other big train stations in Japan, it's a huge shopping mall with department store many... 
    The design of the building is impressive and beautiful, especially inside. It's also very big. Like any other big train stations in Japan, it's a huge shopping mall with department store many...  more »
Google
  • One of the most impressive building I've ever seen in my life. The architecture is a marvel of human engineering. I highly recommend going to the upper deck, you'll get a great view of the Kyoto Tower !
  • Kyōto Station (京都駅, Kyōto-eki) is a major railway station and transportation hub in Kyōto, Japan. It has Japan's second-largest station building (after Nagoya Station) and is one of the country's largest buildings, incorporating a shopping mall, hotel, movie theater, Isetan department store, and several local government facilities under one 15-story roof. It also housed the Kyōto City Air Terminal until August 31, 2002 . Kyoto Station is served by the following railway lines: Central Japan Railway Company (JR Central) Tokaido Shinkansen West Japan Railway Company (JR West) Tokaido Main Line (Biwako Line and JR Kyoto Line) Sanin Main Line (Sagano Line) Nara Line Kintetsu Railway Kyoto Line Kyoto City Subway Karasuma Line In addition to the lines above, the following lines, among others, have through services to Kyoto Station: JR West Kosei Line Kusatsu Line The governmental railway from Kobe reached Kyoto on September 5, 1876, but the station was under construction and a temporary facility called Ōmiya-dōri (Ōmiya Street) Temporary Station was used until the opening of the main station. The first Kyoto Station opened for service by decree of Emperor Meiji on February 5, 1877. In 1889, the railway became a part of the trunk line to Tokyo (Tokaido Main Line). Subsequently, the station became the terminal of two private railways, Nara Railway (1895, present-day Nara Line) and Kyoto Railway (1897, present-day Sagano Line), that connected the station with southern and northern regions of Kyoto Prefecture, respectively. The station was replaced by a newer, Renaissance-inspired facility in 1914, which featured a broad square (the site of demolished first station) leading from the station to Shichijō Avenue. Before and during World War II, the square was often used by imperial motorcades when Emperor Showa traveled between Kyoto and Tokyo. The station was spacious and designed to handle a large number of people, but when a few thousand people gathered to bid farewell to naval recruits on January 8, 1934, 77 people were crushed to death. This station burned to the ground in 1950, and was replaced by a more utilitarian concrete facility in 1952. The current Kyoto Station opened in 1997, commemorating Kyoto's 1,200th anniversary. It is 70 meters high and 470 meters from east to west, with a total floor area of 238,000 square meters. Architecturally, it exhibits many characteristics of futurism, with a slightly irregular cubic façade of plate glass over a steel frame. The architect was Hiroshi Hara. Kyoto, one of the least modern cities in Japan by virtue of its many cultural heritage sites, was largely reluctant to accept such an ambitious structure in the mid-1990s: The station's completion began a wave of new high-rise developments in the city that culminated in the 20-story Kyocera Building. Aside from the main building on the north side of the station, the Hachijō-guchi building on the south side was built to house Tokaido Shinkansen which started operation in 1964. The underground facilities of the station, including the shopping mall Porta beneath the station square, were constructed when the subway opened in 1981.

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